“Background: It is generally understood that shorter Web s


“Background: It is generally understood that shorter Web surveys S63845 concentration and use of incentives result in higher response rates

in Web surveys directed to health care providers. Less is known about potential respondent preference for reduced burden as compared to increased reward.\n\nObjective: To help elicit preference for minimized burden compared to reward for completion of a survey, we observed physician preferences for shorter Web surveys compared to incentives as well as incentive preference (small guaranteed incentive compared to larger lottery incentive) accompanying an electronic request to complete a survey.\n\nMethods: This was an observational study that accompanied a large Web survey study of radiology staff, fellows, and residents at select academic medical centers in the United States. With the request to complete the survey, potential respondents were offered three options: (1) a 10-minute Web survey with the chance to win an iPad, (2) a 10-minute Web survey

with a guaranteed nominal incentive ($ Cyclopamine cell line 5 amazon. com gift card), or (3) a shorter (5-7 minute) Web survey with no incentive. A total of 254 individuals responded to the Web survey request.\n\nResults: Overwhelmingly, individuals chose a longer survey accompanied by an incentive compared to a shorter survey with no incentive (85% compared to 15%, P <. 001). Of those opting for an incentive, a small, but not selleck inhibitor significant majority chose the chance to win an iPad over a guaranteed $5 gift card (56% compared to 44%).\n\nConclusions: When given the choice, radiologists preferred a reward (either guaranteed or based on a lottery) to a less burdensome survey, indicating that researchers should focus more attention at increasing perceived benefits of completing a Web survey compared to decreasing perceived burden.”
“Objective: Accurate measurements of prevalence of “any” breastfeeding and “exclusive” breastfeeding help assess progress toward public health goals. We compared two commonly used data sources

for measuring breastfeeding rates to assess agreement.\n\nMethods: The National Immunization Survey (NIS) is used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to measure progress toward national breastfeeding goals and obtains breastfeeding outcomes retrospectively at 1935 months. The California Newborn Screen (CNS) is a contemporaneous measure of breastfeeding during birth hospitalization and measures progress toward public health goals in California. We compared results for “any breastfeeding” and “exclusive breastfeeding” for California infants in the NIS to those in the CNS using descriptive statistics.\n\nResults: Our results show that the two methods produce similar results for “any” breastfeeding at <4 days: 82.7%, 95% confidence interval (79.6%, 85.

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